Hotel Artemis

Perspective. The lens through which we view the world. We usually focus on the most dominant storyline when it comes to art, as it pertains to film and literature. The subplots take a natural backseat to the action in the foreground. However, a fresh perspective allows for new and creative storytelling. Hotel Artemis seemed intriguing, not only because of a cast including Jodie Foster and Sterling K. Brown, but because it fleshed out a familiar plot point.

 If you’re anything like me, you’ve seen your fair share of crime dramas over the years. You’ll recall that whenever someone is shot or otherwise injured, it poses a real problem when they need medical attention. Well, what if there was a hospital just for criminals? Welcome to Hotel Artemis, which is not really a hotel at all. In this stylish, dark action drama, writer/director Drew Pearce (Iron Man 3) spins a common trope of the genre into a tale of murder and mayhem.

 The film opens in the not-too-distant future of 2028 Los Angeles, as three men attempt a bank heist. Two of the three are brothers, the older played by Sterling K. Brown (Black Panther) and the younger portrayed by Brian Tyree Henry (Atlanta). Gravely wounded, the trio call ahead to book some rooms in the Hotel Artemis, members only. The Artemis deals in anonymity, and each resident is known by the room to which they are assigned. The older brother is assigned to the Waikiki room, and the younger to Honolulu. Jodie Foster (Elysium) stars as The Nurse, gatekeeper and Chief Surgeon, so to speak. She runs a tight ship, adhering to a strict set of rules that only allows treatment for members who have paid the hefty premium.

 The technology in the film is pretty cool, with The Nurse performing complex surgeries in half the normal time. Upon arrival, Waikiki runs into old friend Nice (like the French city), portrayed by Sofia Boutella (Atomic Blonde). She’s at the Artemis for more than just medical care, and her mysterious intentions put her odds with the other guests. Throughout it all, The Nurse is tasked with keeping her unsavory clientele in line, enforcing a strict set of rules with the help of her sidekick, a juiced up looking orderly appropriately nicknamed Everest (Dave Bautista, Avengers: Infinity War). On this particularly chaotic night, a riot rages outside. The people have taken to the streets to protest the privatization of water, a nasty hallmark of this quasi-dystopian future. As if things weren’t hectic enough, The Nurse has one more problem to consider after receiving word that yet another patient will be arriving, this one a VIP. “The Wolf King,” ruling crime boss of LA’s underworld is en route (Jeff Goldblum, Thor: Ragnarok) and cannot be denied.

 Hotel Artemis was a fun movie to watch, largely due to its premise. In some respects, the setting is the star. This film isn’t character driven, it’s plot driven. The characters must sustain the action and carry the film, but their maneuvering is made easier by the film’s construct. Although the Artemis is the focal point and the film’s only real setting, its occupants ensure there is never a dull moment. Sofia Boutella proves that her turn in last year’s Atomic Blonde wasn’t a fluke, dispatching unwanted guests Oldboy style. Sterling K. Brown is just a pleasure to watch, in any setting. I rooted for Waikiki, the dutiful older sibling, always making sacrifices. And Jodie Foster, well she’s Jodie Foster. In sum, Hotel Artemis was a cut above your average shoot ‘em up, a cool movie that refreshingly expounded upon a common thematic element. I don’t think you’ll be disappointed.

Grade: A-

Ocean’s 8

There’s something to be said for novelty, for curiosity. If you add a twist to a familiar theme, you’ve got my attention. Such was the formula of Ocean’s 8, a spinoff of the popular Ocean’s Eleven franchise that spawned two sequels. This time around it’s Danny Ocean’s sister Deborah (Sandra Bullock, Our Brand Is Crisis) who has taken up the mantle. Recently paroled, Deborah begins cooking up her next caper soon after doing a 5-year stretch.  She connects with old pal Lou (Cate Blanchett, Thor: Ragnarok), and the two hatch a plan to rob the Met Gala.

I’m usually skeptical of reboots and updated versions of movie franchises. For example, I was ambivalent about the Ghostbusters reboot and I generally dislike the idea of making the “Black” or “female” version of popular movies. However, I’m a fan like anyone else, and star power is a legitimate draw. An all-star lineup attracts audiences, and that is the universal appeal of Ocean’s 8. Somehow my snobby cinematic preferences went out the window when I heard that Cate Blanchett and Rihanna were going to be in the all-girl interpretation of Ocean’s Eleven, itself a reboot of the 1960 Rat Pack classic.

Writer/director Gary Ross (The Hunger Games) has created a fun, slick caper that doesn’t quite live up to Steven Soderbergh’s original Ocean’s Eleven, but more than holds its own against Ocean’s 12 and 13. Deb and Lou assemble a team whose mission is to swipe a diamond Cartier necklace from starlet Daphne Kluger (Anne Hathaway, Alice Through the Looking Glass), who will be wearing the jewelry worth 150 million dollars to the Met Ball. Through an intricate plan involving surveillance, reconnaissance, and good old-fashioned luck, the hodgepodge team of bandits set the stage to pull off the brazen heist.

Rihanna (Annie) features prominently as Nine Ball, hacker extraordinaire and overall badass, much like the singer herself. Rounding out the cast are Sarah Paulson (The Post) as Tammy, Mindy Kaling (A Wrinkle in Time) as Amita, high-strung and anxious to get out from under her mother’s thumb, and Awkwafina as a sticky-fingered hipster. The esteemed Helena Bonham Carter (Alice Through the Looking Glass) appears as fashion designer Rose Weil, tasked with dressing Daphne for the ball and rigging the necklace. The audacious caper requires extraordinary skill and luck, and of course it’s all farfetched, but that’s not the point!

Ross lacks the finesse of the aforementioned Soderbergh, so the film wasn’t as slick and polished as the other “Ocean’s” movies. Nevertheless, there were tonal similarities, and the cast’s chemistry and camaraderie made the movie as fun to watch as it probably was to film. The movie’s flaws weren’t significant, as I expect some suspension of disbelief and understand that any retread inherently lacks originality. Ross allowed the cast to shine, even if their considerable talents may not have been particularly tested by the material here. Rihanna was surprisingly effective, and Paulson and Hathaway were particularly endearing. This was perfect summer fare.

Grade: A-

Deadpool 2

Superhero roles in Hollywood are coveted. Most often the character will have a built-in audience, and comic book movies routinely debut at number one at the box office. Some actors are fortunate enough to get more than one opportunity to don a pair of tights and save the world. Chris Evans is one example, having been both Johnny Blaze of the Fantastic Four and the iconic Captain America. Similarly, Ryan Reynolds (The Hitman’s Bodyguard) got two bites of the apple, having starred in both the regrettable Green Lantern and the wickedly funny Deadpool. In Deadpool 2 Reynolds returns as the quick-witted facially challenged Wade Wilson, to great effect.

We find Wade living happily, still in a relationship with his beloved Vanessa (Morena Baccarin, Gotham). Can I take a moment to applaud Vanessa as a great superhero girlfriend? I mean Pepper Potts (Iron Man’s girlfriend) is cool and all, but who else is there? Vanessa’s love has never faltered, despite her man resembling Freddy Krueger on a good day. Recall Wade’s backstory from the first movie: he was diagnosed with Cancer, a nefarious group offered a cure that obliterated the cancer and gave him mutant powers of immortality and invincibility, but he was terribly disfigured in the process. The couple have endured a lot and are excited about starting the next chapter of their lives. That is, until tragedy strikes and sets Wade/Deadpool on a deadly course of revenge.

Deadpool relies on the counsel and encouragement of his roommate Blind Al (Leslie Uggams, Empire) and pal Weasel (T.J. Miller, Office Christmas Party), as he channels his rage and pain into hunting down his enemies. While Deadpool pursues one foe, a new one emerges in Cable (James Brolin, Avengers: Infinity War), a time-traveling villain from the future. Recall from the first movie that the X-Men made a play to recruit Deadpool into their ranks, with unsuccessful results. That continues in the sequel, with Colossus and Negasonic Teenage Warhead encouraging Deadpool to follow a greater calling, defending the innocent. To that end, Wade intervenes after seeing the breaking news story of Firefist, a mutant teenager whose hands hurl flames. Attempting to corral and mentor the wayward youth, Deadpool must contend with Cable, who has come to eliminate the boy before he grows into the monster he’s destined to be.

Forced to rely on others for the first time, Deadpool’s rag-tag band of misfit heroes includes Domino (Zazie Beetz, Atlanta), a badass whose superpower is simply luck. We see a new surrogate family taking shape for Deadpool, and the movie’s irreverent tone is balanced with intermittent humor and warmth, although this allows the film to get away with questionable plot points at times. Deadpool is likeable because he is relatable and funny as hell. Reynolds has never been on anyone’s Best Actor list, but the guy stays in his lane. He’s funny and charming and can still carry a movie despite the inability to rely on that handsome face.

The Deadpool franchise is hilariously self-aware, breaking the fourth wall and eschewing convention by dismantling the superhero mystique. This self-deprecation is what endears the character to audiences and it’s a recipe for success for Marvel Studios.

Grade: A

Annihilation

Science fiction isn’t my favorite genre, but one must be open-minded about art. You never know what may end up being a great film. 2014’s Ex Machina was a film that I assumed I’d dislike, and I actually ended up really enjoying it. When I learned Annihilation not only featured one of my favorite actresses in Natalie Portman, but also that Ex Machina’s director Alex Garland was responsible, I was convinced it was worthy of a Movie Pass swipe.

Portman (Jackie) stars as Lena, a biologist and professor recently widowed. Or is she? Her husband Kane (Oscar Isaac, Star Wars: The Last Jedi) has been missing in action for over a year. He never returned from a recon mission that took him inside of a mysterious visible, moving force field dubbed the “shimmer.” Meanwhile, Lena is stuck in a holding pattern, going through the motions of daily life, continuing to teach. But her grief persists, compounded by a lack of closure. Then, one day, Kane reappears. It’s apparent that something is different about him now, from the vacant look in his eyes to the decreased cognition. Eventually he has to be rushed in for medical treatment, quarantined in a nearby government facility. There Lena encounters a team of women, the latest doomed collective to be sent on a virtual suicide mission inside the shimmer. Lead by Dr. Ventress (Jennifer Jason Leigh, Amityville: The Awakening), the small band includes scientists and rescue personnel.

The bulk of the film is told in extended flashback. Lena and Dr. Ventress’ team enter the shimmer, and while five enter, it’s not clear that all five will make it out. We switch back and forth between the present, where Lena is recalling what happened inside the shimmer, and their actual time inside. The shimmer covers a wide, remote area and has moved slowly over time, drifting closer to population centers. Within its depths a unique ecosystem has developed, giving rise to beautiful foliage but also deadly hybrid creatures. Lena is the central figure of the story, and it is through her perspective that most of the action is filtered. Despite the fragility brought on by recent events, she’s surprisingly courageous within the shimmer, boldly facing unknown dangers, including bizarre creatures and supernatural energy. She starts off well with the others at first, but camaraderie gives way to fear and mistrust as they face one threat after another. Undeterred, Lena persists in hopes of getting answers about what happened to her husband.

Annihilation was an okay movie, but that’s the extent of any praise. Although the shimmer’s premise allowed for some cool visual elements and fantasy-driven concepts, the story didn’t have a satisfying resolution. During one weird scene, I took a moment to survey the faces of those around me, to see if they were exasperated, engrossed, or disengaged all together. They seemed to be enjoying it, so perhaps I was missing something. Science fiction is unconstrained by convention, and I think its freedom in storytelling sometimes results in suspect plot development. The performances were more than adequate, and I enjoy both Portman and Issac in mostly everything. Moreover, I was glad to see Tessa Thompson (Thor: Ragnarok) continuing her recent campaign of worthy notches  – but the film felt unremarkable. Perhaps more suited for sci-fi enthusiasts, it fell flat for me. Don’t waste your time unless you’re a fan of the genre.

Grade: C

Red Sparrow

No actor is immune from making a bad movie; even some of the best have been guilty. However, a string of bad films might be cause for concern in an industry where the latest “It” girl can change from one year to the next. I don’t think Jennifer Lawrence (Mother!) has anything to worry about, as she’s been the toast of Tinseltown for a few years now, a bonafide megastar. But Red Sparrow marks her second consecutive disappointing feature (last year’s Mother! was an esoteric mess), and now I know that her presence alone doesn’t necessarily elevate a bad movie.

Red Sparrow intrigued with me its premise, the story of a Russian ballerina who becomes a spy. That’s all I gleaned from the trailer, and I imagined Black Swan meets La Femme Nikita or something. Lawrence stars as Dominika Egorovo, a ballerina with a promising career but meager finances and an ailing mother.  When she suffers a catastrophic injury on stage, she is presented with an opportunity to become a “sparrow,” a covert operative deployed by the Russian government in matters of espionage. Her training commences, and Dominika is subjected to a series of tasks and rituals designed to break her psychologically and emotionally. The film’s first act was its best, and I found it fascinating to witness their methods of training and subjugation. Veteran actor Charlotte Rampling (Assassin’s Creed) is featured as the “Matron,” subjecting the recruits to such humiliation as public nudity and intercourse.

As the film shifted into its second and third acts, the plot veered to and fro, with nothing but Jennifer Lawrence and some nice visuals holding the movie together. Director Francis Lawrence (The Hunger Games: Catching Fire) has shown from his music video beginnings a deft ability to capture stunning visual imagery of his subjects and their environments, and the film’s cinematography was one of its few bright spots. About midway through, Joel Edgerton (Bright) appears as an American spy to whom Dominika is assigned. He attempts to turn her and recruit her as a double agent, and it was all downhill from there. I can’t tell you much else about the film, because at that point I simply didn’t know what was happening anymore.

Jennifer Lawrence is a really good actress. American Hustle, Silver Linings Playbook and Winter’s Bone all prove it. I’m not sure if Red Sparrow seemed like a good script when she initially read it, but I found writer Justin Haythe’s screenplay muddled, meandering, and confusing. Perhaps the source material was richer, but its interpretation left much to be desired. Jennifer Lawrence is better than this? Scenes that were intended as provocative and edgy came across as lurid and trashy instead. I can appreciate the alluring surface qualities, Lawrence’s beauty and the rich decadence of the environment, but that’s where my praise ends. Wait until this one makes its way to HBO.

Grade: C

Black Panther

About three years ago, Marvel announced a solo Black Panther movie. The news was met with enthusiasm, but the energy was largely confined to Marvel fans. Fast forward a couple of years later as buzz builds towards a Black History Month release date, and the masses have been whipped into a collective frenzy – myself included. I said that regardless of my opinion, I would be honest in my review of Black Panther. I told myself that I wouldn’t succumb to groupthink, as I admittedly did in my final grade of Moonlight. I needn’t have worried about that, because Black Panther met every expectation, living up to the hype in a dazzling display of Afro-futurism that left me swelling with pride. And while the film will undoubtedly appeal to a broad cross-section of viewers, there is something uniquely dope about Black Panther that resonates with Black folks particularly.

Chadwick Boseman (Marshall) returns as T’Challa, heir apparent to the throne of Wakanda after the death of his father King T’Chaka. Although the throne would seem T’Challa’s birthright, he still must compete for it, if challenged. In two exhilarating scenes T’Challa competes in tribal battle as inspired Wakandans look on, their shoulders rising and falling rhythmically in ritual witness to the spectacle. Untouched by European imperialism and Western civilization, Wakanda is a thriving bastion of technology due in part to its rich natural supply of Vibranium. Mined from a meteorite that landed thousands of years ago, Vibranium is used for everything from powering transportation to advanced weaponry. In fact, T’Challa’s younger sister Princess Shuri (Letitia Wright, The Commuter) has harnessed its properties brilliantly, unimpeded by Western ideals about traditional female roles.

T’Challa is an empathetic and even-tempered leader. He seems almost reticent to assume the throne, fueled by a sense of responsibility rather than hubris. He has lionized his father his entire life, but as Wakanda confronts new threats, T’Challa must contend with the harsh realization that T’Chaka had moral shortcomings that would prove dire. Enter Erik Killmonger (Michael B. Jordan, Creed), wayward son of Wakanda with questionable origins. He has aligned himself with Wakandan nemesis Ulysses Klaue (Andy Serkis, Star Wars: The Last Jedi), one of the few outsiders who are aware of Vibranium. Very few people know that Wakanda is a thriving epicenter of technology and innovation; most Westerners think it is a primitive, third world country, and it is that fallacy that has sustained Wakanda’s existence. People cannot colonize or exploit that which they do not know exists. But will T’Challa continue the path of isolationism that has sustained Wakanda until now, or will he step to the forefront of the global stage and reveal its greatness?

Black Panther was larger than life. I could fill page after page with praise for the entire cast, including writer/director Ryan Coogler (Creed), who gave the latest Marvel entrant an added layer of cultural significance while putting his signature Oakland twist on the story. He was my quiet favorite after his debut Fruitvale Station, but after pairing with Michael B. Jordan for a third time, the two are charting a relationship on par with DeNiro or DiCaprio and Scorsese. That may sound like lofty praise right now, but I think we are just scratching the surface. The film’s cultural impact cannot be overstated, and the power of film as a medium cannot be denied.

Marvel fans will enjoy the accurate interpretation of the Black Panther and his origins, while many Black moviegoers will recognize the film as a defining moment in the culture. The beauty, strength and power of African people was on glorious display throughout, and the film’s casting reflected a deliberate representation of beautiful, strong dark-skinned actresses like Lupita N’yongo (Star Wars: The Last Jedi) and Danai Gurira (All Eyez On Me) – a stark contrast to most mainstream movies. The film hinted at the greatness and untapped potential of the continent, and challenged its viewers with powerful themes that served as metaphors for the current state of our communities. At the risk of turning this review into a dissertation, I’ll conclude my thoughts by saying: Black Panther was flawless, and should be etched in the pantheon of Black cinema as required viewing.

Grade: A

Hostiles

Versatility. Range. To me, these are the hallmarks of great acting – and they have served Christian Bale (The Big Short) well, from The Fighter to American Hustle. Hostiles marks his return to the Western, his first since 2007’s 3:10 to Yuma. One would hope that the genre has evolved enough to be devoid of stereotypes, while maintaining historical accuracy in a way that doesn’t sacrifice artistic merit. Hostiles didn’t break new ground within the genre, but emotional dramatic turns from Bale and co-star Rosamund Pike (Gone Girl) make it a worthwhile film.

Set in 1892, the film depicts a rough and tumble American landscape of centuries past. Bale stars as Joseph Blocker, an Army captain tasked with a final mission before retirement, which he begrudgingly accepts. He must transport a dying Apache chief and his family back to their home state of Montana, as the elder is riddled with Cancer and has been granted mercy to die on his homeland. Violent and racist, Blocker’s visceral contempt for Native Americans could not be more obvious, and he pleads in futility to be excused from the mission. His superior officer ignores those complaints, and Blocker leads a small party of soldiers in the transport of Chief Yellow Hawk (Wes Studi, A Million Ways to Die in the West) and his family, including his adult children and grandson.

Historical accuracy is important, and while it is true that some early Native Americans terrorized White settlers expanding West, it is equally true that White colonizers terrorized the indigenous populations already here. Be that as it may, the film did an effective job in its first act, presenting both sides of a philosophical coin in its depiction of brutality. In a riveting opening scene, a Comanche tribe descends upon a family to steal their horses. They slaughtered them all, save for Pike’s character Rosalie, now a grieving mother and widow. Blocker and company encounter the woman en route, and she joins their small, weary procession.

Hostiles is quite simply a movie about a journey from point A to point B. The strength of the film is in the richness and depth of the characters and the performances. The Captain is a figure whom you can’t quite root for or against. Initially Blocker is cruel, failing to see the humanity in his charge. However, in moments with the soldiers under his command and in his interaction with Rosalie, we see genuine affection and tenderness, a reminder of the complexity of human nature and the duality that lies within all of us. He is an effective leader, engendering loyalty that is met with a deep and loving gratitude. As they encounter peril in their journey, circumstances force Blocker to amend his dealings with Yellow Hawk and to forge a new, albeit begrudging respect as they face a common enemy together.

An air of sadness hangs over the film, giving it a somber tone throughout. I was moved by its theme of reflection, as several characters bleakly assessed their own careers and lives, burdened by the weight of loss. I was particularly struck by a poignant scene between two lieutenants, as the younger (Jesse Plemons, The Post) reflects on his first killing. The contrast between the two men was powerful, the older immune to regret over certain lives but not others. This emotional compartmentalization exemplified the cynicism of war and of life generally, and it was portrayed beautifully.

My critique of the film boils down to a matter of taste, of whether or not one can get past the limitations of the genre and the fact that it isn’t a “feel good” movie.  Hostiles was a fine film, featuring another excellent performance by Christian Bale, and a rich emotional turn from Rosamund Pike, which may be enough for some moviegoers.

Grade: B+