Annihilation

Science fiction isn’t my favorite genre, but one must be open-minded about art. You never know what may end up being a great film. 2014’s Ex Machina was a film that I assumed I’d dislike, and I actually ended up really enjoying it. When I learned Annihilation not only featured one of my favorite actresses in Natalie Portman, but also that Ex Machina’s director Alex Garland was responsible, I was convinced it was worthy of a Movie Pass swipe.

Portman (Jackie) stars as Lena, a biologist and professor recently widowed. Or is she? Her husband Kane (Oscar Isaac, Star Wars: The Last Jedi) has been missing in action for over a year. He never returned from a recon mission that took him inside of a mysterious visible, moving force field dubbed the “shimmer.” Meanwhile, Lena is stuck in a holding pattern, going through the motions of daily life, continuing to teach. But her grief persists, compounded by a lack of closure. Then, one day, Kane reappears. It’s apparent that something is different about him now, from the vacant look in his eyes to the decreased cognition. Eventually he has to be rushed in for medical treatment, quarantined in a nearby government facility. There Lena encounters a team of women, the latest doomed collective to be sent on a virtual suicide mission inside the shimmer. Lead by Dr. Ventress (Jennifer Jason Leigh, Amityville: The Awakening), the small band includes scientists and rescue personnel.

The bulk of the film is told in extended flashback. Lena and Dr. Ventress’ team enter the shimmer, and while five enter, it’s not clear that all five will make it out. We switch back and forth between the present, where Lena is recalling what happened inside the shimmer, and their actual time inside. The shimmer covers a wide, remote area and has moved slowly over time, drifting closer to population centers. Within its depths a unique ecosystem has developed, giving rise to beautiful foliage but also deadly hybrid creatures. Lena is the central figure of the story, and it is through her perspective that most of the action is filtered. Despite the fragility brought on by recent events, she’s surprisingly courageous within the shimmer, boldly facing unknown dangers, including bizarre creatures and supernatural energy. She starts off well with the others at first, but camaraderie gives way to fear and mistrust as they face one threat after another. Undeterred, Lena persists in hopes of getting answers about what happened to her husband.

Annihilation was an okay movie, but that’s the extent of any praise. Although the shimmer’s premise allowed for some cool visual elements and fantasy-driven concepts, the story didn’t have a satisfying resolution. During one weird scene, I took a moment to survey the faces of those around me, to see if they were exasperated, engrossed, or disengaged all together. They seemed to be enjoying it, so perhaps I was missing something. Science fiction is unconstrained by convention, and I think its freedom in storytelling sometimes results in suspect plot development. The performances were more than adequate, and I enjoy both Portman and Issac in mostly everything. Moreover, I was glad to see Tessa Thompson (Thor: Ragnarok) continuing her recent campaign of worthy notches  – but the film felt unremarkable. Perhaps more suited for sci-fi enthusiasts, it fell flat for me. Don’t waste your time unless you’re a fan of the genre.

Grade: C

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